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July 28, 2017 Issue  
Lansing, New York  
Volume 13, Issue 29

posticon Planning Board Dismayed by Mall Senior Housing Plan

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Lansing MeadowsThis 2017 rendering shows a three-story, 30 apartment building facing Oakcrest Road with 54 parking spaces. Wetlands have been greatly reduced, and a bird sanctuary is no longer contemplated.

Village of Lansing Planning Board members said in no uncertain terms Tuesday that they would not approve the most recent incarnation of the Lansing Meadows project that would bring rental senior housing to the Shops at Ithaca Mall.  The project, originally 12 units in cottage-style buildings intended for rental to seniors, a wetlands area and bird sanctuary, was part of a plan to make the construction of a big box store to the north of the mall palatable to the Village, and to provide a buffer from the commercial area and a gradual transition from the high density commercial area to residential neighborhoods north of Oakcrest Road.  Planning Board members said they had been tolerant of delays, changes to the plan, and even a small commercial area they did not want, but the latest design was unacceptable.

"What I see now is, you got BJ's, which you cashed out of; you now want and have obtained permission to put in a coffee shop; now you want us to say, 'nah, we don't want those cottages to look like residences.  We'll take a big building'," Planning Board member Deborah Dawson told developer Eric Goetzmann Tuesday.  "No habitat.  No wetlands.  No good looking green space.  Just another big blocky building.  No transition.  As far as I'm concerned, what this thing looks like now is not at all what the PDA envisioned.  Not at all what the IDA thought they were getting.  Not a transition.  Not a neighborhood.  And not anything that really meets the requirements of the Comprehensive Plan.  So, as far as I'm concerned, my answer to all of this is no.  I want what we bargained for in the first place."

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posticon Lansing Bicentennial Minute

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Lansing Bicentennial Minute In 1856 Senator William H. Seward introduced a bill in congress that the United States should take possession of any guano islands outside the jurisdiction of foreign nations. (Guano was a good source of fertilizer needed by our farmers.) America quickly claimed dozens of islands in the Caribbean and Pacific. During World War II several islands, including Johnston and Midway, were important military bases.
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posticon Small Home Community Proposed For Town Land

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Tiny Timbers InteriorHomes are timber framed with many wood finishes inside and outside, and some traditional dry wall finishes on the inside. Details include bamboo flooring, some stone flooring, stone counter tops, lighting, and wood ceilings. All photos and maps courtesy of STREAM Collaborative.

The Town of Lansing is negotiating with developers to finally sell parts of the 153 acre parcel of land across State Route 34B from the Town Hall campus and ball fields.  Two are further along in negotiations than others, and last week developers of one of them presented a preliminary view of their project to Town officials.  The Lansing Cottage Community project will likely begin with 10 single family homes, then, if the market will bear future phases, expand to a 60 home community.

The builder is called Tiny Timber, LLC, but these are not tiny houses.  'Tiny houses' tend to be only around 200 square feet, and built to travel on wheels.  Designs start at about 600 square feet for a cottage style home.  The Lansing project will be more in the 1,000 to 1200 square foot range, and possibly up to 1900 square feet if a home includes a finished basement.  The developer's aim is to provide smaller, good quality affordable homes targeted at young people looking for a first home or older homeowners who want to downsize.

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posticon Lansing School Lunches Rise 10 Cents

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Another year, another rise in the cost of school lunches. This month the Lansing Board of Education raised the price by ten cents for its elementary, middle, and high schools. Food Service Director Sandi Swearingen said the rise is necessary to remain in compliance with the Federal Lunch Equity mandate by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) that provides free lunches for school children who are eligible for for free or reduced price meals.

"The recommendation for lunch prices for the 2017-18 school year is to increase them by ten cents based on the State's Lunch Equity Tool," Food Service Director Sandi Swearingen told the Board. "It increases the Elementary and Middle school lunches to $2.80, and the High School is increased to $3.00."

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